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It’s good to avoid conflict but not to appease or ignore those who have clearly demonstrated their intention to harm you or your family.

Your enemy could be anything from a playground / bar / business or club bully to someone accosting you and your spouse on a lonely path at night, to some parasite breaking in to your home to take your stuff. It could be a bank manager, creeping debt, a neighbour, a debt collector, or a personal enemy. There are five ways to overcome your enemy effectively.

It’s known that the world over, special forces and highly trained fighting units believe in the three proven principles of  “Surprise, Speed, and Violence of Action” applied together. These are the first three way to overcome your enemy. Cedric Rice writes in Military News and Military Rings, “The term violence of action literally means the unrestricted use of speed, strength, surprise, and aggression to achieve total dominance against your enemy.

“Allow me to say that if these factors are applied with absolute aggression a small weak combatant can easily win an engagement or a prolonged conflict with a superior adversary.

“The goal of fighting any war or battle is to win. The results of being killed are pretty final and chances are that if you are the one who ended up dead you probably lost the battle. If you are totally focused on winning and use all of these factors in combination you virtually assure yourself of the victory. When in doubt ATTACK!!” More of his article here. After all, isn’t this why the British lost the Boer War and why the Americans lost in Vietnam and other countries? The unexpected response is powerful.

Overcoming your enemy doesn’t have to be physical but it should include the same three principles.

The fourth way is understanding – knowledge is powerful, and a lot of background information can be gleaned from the Internet, although a lot of what you read on the Internet is, admittedly, garbage. Hire a private detective, take time to observe, ask questions and investigate, in order to maximize your impact. Get legal advice. The same principles apply: seek the weak spots, move fast and decisively when you do at an unexpected time, and, as a good friend once told me, “don’t stop hitting until he’s on the ground and can’t get up again.”

The fifth way is strategic:  To be patient when it’s appropriate – wait until he thinks you’ve gone away and  given up, then strike like lightning, think through your Plan of Action, taking into account all the “What If?” scenarios. Leverage existing scenarios, turn his friends into his enemies, undermine his credibility, soften him up before you attack, use misinformation and deception. Read The Art of War by Sun Tzu.

Finally, there are times to ignore people, since that is the highest insult you can pay someone. And many deserve it. A tiger doesn’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.

Forewarned is forearmed: prepare in advance for all eventualities.

Robin Elliott   LeverageAdvantage.com

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